01 Mar, 2023

Insufficient Session Timeout

Vulnerability Assessment as a Service (VAaaS)

Tests systems and applications for vulnerabilities to address weaknesses.

Insufficient Session Timeout refers to a security vulnerability where a web application or system does not have an adequate session timeout duration. Session timeout refers to the amount of time a user’s session remains active after they have logged into a system or application. If the session timeout is too short or not implemented correctly, it can leave the user’s session open for an extended period, allowing unauthorized access to their account and sensitive information. This can lead to potential security breaches, data theft, and other malicious activities.

Example of vulnerable code on different programming languages:


in PHP:

				
					ini_set('session.gc_maxlifetime', 3600); // set session timeout to 1 hour
session_start();

				
			


In this example, the session timeout is set to 1 hour. However, this is not enough to ensure that a user’s session is adequately protected. An attacker could potentially hijack a user’s session by stealing their session ID and accessing their account before the session times out.

• in Java:

				
					HttpSession session = request.getSession();
session.setMaxInactiveInterval(1800); // set session timeout to 30 minutes

				
			


In this example, the session timeout is set to 30 minutes, which may not be enough to prevent unauthorized access to a user’s account. An attacker could potentially use a session fixation attack to take control of a user’s session and access their account before the session times out.

• in Python:

				
					from flask import Flask, session
app = Flask(__name__)
app.config['PERMANENT_SESSION_LIFETIME'] = 1800 # set session timeout to 30 minutes

				
			


In this example, the session timeout is set to 30 minutes. However, this may not be enough to ensure that a user’s session is adequately protected. An attacker could potentially use a session hijacking attack to take control of a user’s session and access their account before the session times out.

Examples of exploitation Insufficient Session Timeout

Session Hijacking:

An attacker can use session hijacking to take control of a user’s session and gain unauthorized access to their account. If the session timeout is not set correctly or is too long, the attacker can continue to use the user’s session ID even after the user has logged out or closed their browser.

Session Fixation:

An attacker can use session fixation to set the session ID of a user before they log in, allowing them to take control of the user’s session once they log in. If the session timeout is not set correctly or is too long, the attacker can continue to use the user’s session ID even after the user has logged out or closed their browser.

Data Theft:

An attacker can use Insufficient Session Timeout to steal sensitive data by accessing a user’s account after the user has logged out or closed their browser. For example, if a user enters their credit card details into a shopping cart, an attacker can steal the data by accessing the user’s session after it has timed out.

Account Takeover:

An attacker can use Insufficient Session Timeout to take over a user’s account by accessing their session after the user has logged out or closed their browser. The attacker can then change the user’s password and take control of the account.

Malicious Activities:

An attacker can use Insufficient Session Timeout to carry out other malicious activities, such as uploading malware or stealing sensitive information, by accessing a user’s account after the user has logged out or closed their browser.

Privilege escalation techniques for Insufficient Session Timeout

Session Fixation:

An attacker can use session fixation to set the session ID of a user before they log in. This allows the attacker to take control of the user’s session once they log in, and potentially escalate their privileges by accessing sensitive areas of the application that require higher privileges.

Session Hijacking:

An attacker can use session hijacking to take control of a user’s session, and potentially escalate their privileges by accessing sensitive areas of the application that require higher privileges.

Cross-Site Scripting (XSS):

An attacker can use XSS to inject malicious code into a web page, which can then be executed by other users who view the page. If the user who views the page has an active session, the attacker can potentially use Insufficient Session Timeout to take control of the user’s session and escalate their privileges.

Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF):

An attacker can use CSRF to trick a user into executing malicious actions on a web application without their knowledge. If the user has an active session, the attacker can potentially use Insufficient Session Timeout to take control of the user’s session and escalate their privileges.

Brute-Force Attacks:

An attacker can use brute-force attacks to guess a user’s session ID, and potentially escalate their privileges by accessing sensitive areas of the application that require higher privileges.

General methodology and checklist for Insufficient Session Timeout

Methodology:

  1. Identify the session management mechanism used in the application. This could be cookies, URL rewriting, or a combination of both.

  2. Determine the session timeout value used by the application. This can be done by analyzing the application’s source code or by intercepting and inspecting the session cookie.

  3. Attempt to extend the session duration by sending requests to the application at regular intervals. This can be done using tools such as Burp Suite or OWASP ZAP.

  4. Log out of the application and wait for the session timeout to expire. Then, attempt to re-authenticate and access protected resources using the expired session ID.

  5. Attempt to hijack an active session by stealing the session ID of a logged-in user. This can be done by intercepting the session cookie or by performing a session fixation attack.

  6. Test for session fixation vulnerabilities by attempting to set the session ID of a user before they log in.

  7. Test for session hijacking vulnerabilities by attempting to steal the session ID of a logged-in user and use it to gain access to protected resources.

  8. Test for cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities that can be used to steal session IDs or perform other malicious activities.

  9. Test for cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerabilities that can be used to perform actions on behalf of a user without their knowledge or consent.

  10. Test for other authentication and authorization vulnerabilities that can be used to bypass session timeout protections, such as weak password policies or insecure password reset mechanisms.

Checklist:

  1. Identify the session management mechanism used by the application (cookies, URL rewriting, etc.).

  2. Determine the session timeout value used by the application.

  3. Verify that the session timeout value is set correctly and is being enforced.

  4. Attempt to extend an active session beyond its timeout value.

  5. Log out of the application and wait for the session to expire, then attempt to re-authenticate using the expired session ID.

  6. Attempt to hijack an active session by stealing the session ID of a logged-in user.

  7. Test for session fixation vulnerabilities by attempting to set the session ID of a user before they log in.

  8. Test for session hijacking vulnerabilities by attempting to steal the session ID of a logged-in user and use it to gain access to protected resources.

  9. Test for cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities that can be used to steal session IDs or perform other malicious activities.

  10. Test for cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerabilities that can be used to perform actions on behalf of a user without their knowledge or consent.

  11. Test for other authentication and authorization vulnerabilities that can be used to bypass session timeout protections, such as weak password policies or insecure password reset mechanisms.

  12. Ensure that session IDs are properly regenerated after a user logs out or changes their password.

  13. Test the application under different scenarios, such as when a user is idle or when multiple users are using the application concurrently.

  14. Document any vulnerabilities found and provide recommendations for remediation.

Tools set for exploiting Insufficient Session Timeout

Automated tools:

  • Burp Suite: A powerful web application security testing tool that can be used to test for a wide range of vulnerabilities, including Insufficient Session Timeout. It includes a range of automated tools and features for detecting and exploiting vulnerabilities.

  • OWASP ZAP: An open-source web application security testing tool that can be used for automated scanning, vulnerability detection, and exploit testing.

  • Nmap: A network exploration and security auditing tool that can be used to scan for open ports, identify vulnerabilities, and exploit them.

  • Metasploit Framework: A penetration testing tool that includes a range of exploits and payloads for testing vulnerabilities in web applications and systems.

  • sqlmap: An automated tool for testing SQL injection vulnerabilities in web applications.

  • Acunetix: A web application security scanner that can be used to test for a wide range of vulnerabilities, including Insufficient Session Timeout.

  • Netsparker: A web application security scanner that uses advanced scanning techniques to detect and exploit vulnerabilities, including Insufficient Session Timeout.

  • Vega: An open-source web application security testing tool that can be used to scan for vulnerabilities and exploit them.

  • AppScan: A web application security testing tool that can be used to scan for vulnerabilities and exploit them.

  • Skipfish: An automated web application security testing tool that can be used to detect and exploit vulnerabilities, including Insufficient Session Timeout.

Manual tools:

  • Browser extensions: There are several browser extensions available that can be used to manipulate cookies and session IDs, such as EditThisCookie, Cookie Manager+, and Cookie-Editor.

  • cURL: A command-line tool for transferring data using various protocols, including HTTP. It can be used to manipulate cookies and session IDs.

  • Fiddler: A web debugging tool that can be used to inspect and manipulate web traffic, including cookies and session IDs.

  • Wireshark: A network protocol analyzer that can be used to capture and analyze network traffic, including cookies and session IDs.

  • Tamper Data: A browser plugin that can be used to intercept and modify HTTP requests, including cookies and session IDs.

  • Charles Proxy: A web debugging proxy that can be used to inspect and manipulate web traffic, including cookies and session IDs.

  • Selenium: A web testing framework that can be used to automate browser interactions and test for vulnerabilities, including Insufficient Session Timeout.

  • Curlie: A command-line tool for transferring data using various protocols, including HTTP. It can be used to manipulate cookies and session IDs.

  • Sqlninja: A tool for exploiting SQL injection vulnerabilities in web applications.

  • BeEF: A browser exploitation framework that can be used to test for a range of vulnerabilities, including Insufficient Session Timeout.

Average CVSS score of stack Insufficient Session Timeout

The Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) provides a framework for rating the severity of vulnerabilities on a scale from 0 to 10, with higher scores indicating more severe vulnerabilities. The score takes into account a variety of factors such as the attack complexity, exploitability, and impact on confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the affected system.

The CVSS score of vulnerabilities related to Insufficient Session Timeout can vary depending on the specifics of the vulnerability, such as the type of session management mechanism used and the impact of an attacker being able to exploit the vulnerability. Generally, vulnerabilities related to Insufficient Session Timeout are rated as medium to high severity, with CVSS scores ranging from 4.0 to 9.0 or higher.

However, it’s important to note that the CVSS score should be just one factor considered when evaluating the severity of a vulnerability. Other factors, such as the likelihood of the vulnerability being exploited in a real-world scenario and the potential impact on the affected system, should also be taken into account.

The Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE)

• CWE-613: Insufficient Session Expiration – This weakness occurs when a web application does not properly expire user sessions after a certain amount of time, leaving them vulnerable to session hijacking attacks.

• CWE-310: Cryptographic Issues – This weakness occurs when a web application uses weak or insecure encryption methods to protect session data, making it easier for attackers to access and manipulate session information.

• CWE-807: Reliance on Untrusted Inputs in a Security Decision – This weakness occurs when a web application relies on untrusted input to make decisions about session management, potentially allowing attackers to bypass session protections.

• CWE-829: Inclusion of Functionality from Untrusted Control Sphere – This weakness occurs when a web application includes session management functionality from an untrusted source, making it vulnerable to attacks that exploit the untrusted code.

• CWE-522: Insufficiently Protected Credentials – This weakness occurs when session data is not properly protected, leaving credentials and other sensitive information vulnerable to theft or manipulation.

• CWE-693: Protection Mechanism Failure – This weakness occurs when session management protections fail due to implementation errors, leaving the application vulnerable to attack.

• CWE-799: Improper Control of Interaction Frequency – This weakness occurs when a web application does not properly limit the frequency of user interactions, making it easier for attackers to exploit session vulnerabilities.

• CWE-613: Insufficient Session Expiration – This weakness occurs when a web application does not properly expire user sessions after a certain amount of time, leaving them vulnerable to session hijacking attacks.

• CWE-525: Information Leak Through Query Strings in GET Request – This weakness occurs when sensitive information is passed through GET requests, potentially exposing it to unauthorized access or manipulation.

• CWE-912: Hidden Functionality – This weakness occurs when a web application includes hidden or undocumented session management functionality, making it easier for attackers to exploit session vulnerabilities.

Top 10 CVES related to Insufficient Session Timeout

• CVE-2023-24522 – Due to insufficient input sanitization, SAP NetWeaver AS ABAP (Business Server Pages) – versions 700, 701, 702, 731, 740, allows an unauthenticated user to alter the current session of the user by injecting the malicious code over the network and gain access to the unintended data. This may lead to a limited impact on the confidentiality and the integrity of the application.

• CVE-2023-24521 – Due to insufficient input sanitization, SAP NetWeaver AS ABAP (BSP Framework) – versions 700, 701, 702, 731, 740, 750, 751, 752, 753, 754, 755, 756, 757, allows an unauthenticated user to alter the current session of the user by injecting the malicious code over the network and gain access to the unintended data. This may lead to a limited impact on the confidentiality and the integrity of the application.

• CVE-2023-23614 – Pi-hole®’s Web interface (based off of AdminLTE) provides a central location to manage your Pi-hole. Versions 4.0 and above, prior to 5.18.3 are vulnerable to Insufficient Session Expiration. Improper use of admin WEBPASSWORD hash as “Remember me for 7 days” cookie value makes it possible for an attacker to “pass the hash” to login or reuse a theoretically expired “remember me” cookie. It also exposes the hash over the network and stores it unnecessarily in the browser. The cookie itself is set to expire after 7 days but its value will remain valid as long as the admin password doesn’t change. If a cookie is leaked or compromised it could be used forever as long as the admin password is not changed. An attacker that obtained the password hash via an other attack vector (for example a path traversal vulnerability) could use it to login as the admin by setting the hash as the cookie value without the need to crack it to obtain the admin password (pass the hash). The hash is exposed over the network and in the browser where the cookie is transmitted and stored. This issue is patched in version 5.18.3.

• CVE-2023-22771 – An insufficient session expiration vulnerability exists in the ArubaOS command line interface. Successful exploitation of this vulnerability allows an attacker to keep a session running on an affected device after the removal of the impacted account

• CVE-2023-0227 – Insufficient Session Expiration in GitHub repository pyload/pyload prior to 0.5.0b3.dev36.

• CVE-2022-41208 – Due to insufficient input validation, SAP Financial Consolidation – version 1010, allows an authenticated attacker with user privileges to alter current user session. On successful exploitation, the attacker can view or modify information, causing a limited impact on confidentiality and integrity of the application.

• CVE-2022-4070 – Insufficient Session Expiration in GitHub repository librenms/librenms prior to 22.10.0.

• CVE-2022-39031 – Smart eVision has insufficient authorization for task acquisition function. An unauthorized remote attacker can exploit this vulnerability to acquire the Session IDs of other general users only.

• CVE-2022-34392 – SupportAssist for Home PCs (versions 3.11.4 and prior) contain an insufficient session expiration Vulnerability. An authenticated non-admin user can be able to obtain the refresh token and that leads to reuse the access token and fetch sensitive information.

• CVE-2022-3362 – Insufficient Session Expiration in GitHub repository ikus060/rdiffweb prior to 2.5.0.

Insufficient Session Timeout exploits

  • Session Fixation Attack – This attack involves an attacker setting the session ID of a user to a known value, which allows the attacker to hijack the user’s session and gain access to sensitive information or perform actions on behalf of the user.

  • Session Hijacking – This attack involves an attacker intercepting and using an active session of an authorized user to gain access to sensitive information or perform unauthorized actions.

  • Brute Force Attack – This attack involves an attacker attempting to guess a valid session ID by systematically trying different values until a valid session ID is found.

  • Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) – This attack involves injecting malicious scripts into a web page that is viewed by an authorized user, allowing the attacker to steal session information or perform actions on behalf of the user.

  • Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF) – This attack involves an attacker tricking an authorized user into performing an action that the attacker wants, such as changing the user’s password or making a financial transaction, by exploiting the user’s active session.

  • Session Sidejacking – This attack involves an attacker intercepting an authorized user’s session data over an unsecured network, such as a public Wi-Fi hotspot, and using it to gain access to sensitive information or perform unauthorized actions.

  • Session Replay Attack – This attack involves an attacker intercepting and recording a session between a user and a server, and then replaying the session at a later time to gain access to sensitive information or perform unauthorized actions.

  • Man-in-the-Middle (MITM) Attack – This attack involves an attacker intercepting and modifying network traffic between a user and a server, allowing the attacker to steal session information or perform unauthorized actions.

Practicing in test for Insufficient Session Timeout

Create a test environment – Set up a test environment with a vulnerable web application that contains Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities. Use this environment to practice testing for and exploiting these vulnerabilities.

Perform a manual vulnerability assessment – Start by manually testing the application for Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities. Use various tools and techniques to identify vulnerabilities, such as manually manipulating session IDs, modifying cookies, and testing session timeouts.

Use automated testing tools – There are various automated tools available that can help identify Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities, such as Burp Suite, OWASP ZAP, and Nessus.

Try to exploit identified vulnerabilities – Once vulnerabilities have been identified, try to exploit them by performing various attacks such as session hijacking, session fixation, and session replay.

Practice remediation techniques – Once vulnerabilities have been identified, practice applying remediation techniques such as implementing proper session timeouts, using secure session IDs, and encrypting session data.

Attend training or workshops – Attend training or workshops related to web application security and Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities. This will provide valuable insight and knowledge that can be applied to testing and identifying vulnerabilities.

For study Insufficient Session Timeout

OWASP Top 10: Insufficient Session Expiration – This resource from the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) provides an overview of Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities and how they can be exploited. It also includes best practices for preventing and mitigating these vulnerabilities.

SANS Institute – SANS offers a variety of web application security courses, including courses that cover Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities and how to test for them.

Web Application Hacker’s Handbook – This book by Dafydd Stuttard and Marcus Pinto covers a wide range of web application security topics, including Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities.

PortSwigger Academy – PortSwigger Academy offers a free online course on web application security that covers Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities, as well as other common vulnerabilities.

Practical Web Application Penetration Testing – This book by Prakhar Prasad provides practical guidance on how to perform web application penetration testing, including testing for Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities.

Burp Suite User Guide – Burp Suite is a popular web application security testing tool that can be used to test for Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities. The Burp Suite User Guide provides detailed information on how to use the tool to identify and exploit these vulnerabilities.

YouTube – There are various YouTube channels that cover web application security topics, including Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities. Examples include HackerSploit and Pentester Academy.

Books with review of Insufficient Session Timeout

The Web Application Hacker’s Handbook: Finding and Exploiting Security Flaws, Second Edition by Dafydd Stuttard and Marcus Pinto – This book covers a wide range of web application security topics, including Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities.

Web Application Security: A Beginner’s Guide by Bryan Sullivan and Vincent Liu – This book provides an introduction to web application security, including Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities.

Black Hat Python: Python Programming for Hackers and Pentesters by Justin Seitz – This book covers various topics related to penetration testing, including Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities.

Advanced Penetration Testing for Highly-Secured Environments: The Ultimate Security Guide by Lee Allen and Kevin Cardwell – This book covers advanced penetration testing techniques, including testing for Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities.

Penetration Testing: A Hands-On Introduction to Hacking by Georgia Weidman – This book provides an introduction to penetration testing and covers various security vulnerabilities, including Insufficient Session Timeout.

Gray Hat Hacking: The Ethical Hacker’s Handbook, Fifth Edition by Daniel Regalado, Shon Harris, and Allen Harper – This book covers a range of hacking and penetration testing topics, including Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities.

The Basics of Hacking and Penetration Testing: Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing Made Easy, Second Edition by Patrick Engebretson – This book provides an introduction to hacking and penetration testing, including testing for Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities.

Practical Web Application Penetration Testing by Prakhar Prasad – This book provides practical guidance on how to perform web application penetration testing, including testing for Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities.

Hacking Web Apps: Detecting and Preventing Web Application Security Problems by Mike Shema – This book covers various web application security topics, including Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities.

Breaking into Information Security: Crafting a Custom Career Path to Get the Job You Really Want by Josh More – This book provides guidance on how to build a career in information security, including web application security testing and identifying Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities.

List of payloads Insufficient Session Timeout

  • Manipulate session cookies: This can be done by modifying the session ID in the cookie, for example by using a tool like Burp Suite to intercept and modify the session cookie.

  • Set a long session timeout: By setting the session timeout to a very long value, such as several days or weeks, it is possible to test if the application will keep the session active for an extended period of time.

  • Use multiple sessions simultaneously: By opening multiple sessions in the same browser, or in different browsers, it is possible to test if the application will maintain separate session state for each session.

  • Test for session hijacking: By stealing a valid session ID and using it to authenticate as the user, it is possible to test if the application will recognize that the session has been compromised.

  • Test for session fixation: By setting a known session ID in the cookie before authentication, it is possible to test if the application will accept and use the known session ID instead of generating a new one.

  • Test for session termination: By logging out of the application and then attempting to use a previous session cookie, it is possible to test if the application will correctly terminate the session and require re-authentication.

  • Test for session expiration: By waiting for the session timeout period to expire and then attempting to use a previous session cookie, it is possible to test if the application will correctly expire the session and require re-authentication.

  • Use automated testing tools: Automated testing tools like OWASP ZAP or Acunetix can be used to test for Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities by automatically sending a variety of payloads to the application.

  • Use browser plugins: Browser plugins like Cookie Editor or Tamper Data can be used to manually modify session cookies and test for Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities.

  • Test for session persistence: By restarting the application server or database and then attempting to use a previous session cookie, it is possible to test if the application will persist session state across server restarts or database resets.

How to be protected from Insufficient Session Timeout

  1. Use short session timeouts: Sessions should have a short timeout period, typically no more than 30 minutes, to reduce the risk of session hijacking or fixation.

  2. Implement session termination: Sessions should be terminated when the user logs out, or after a period of inactivity, to ensure that session state is cleared and cannot be reused.

  3. Use strong session IDs: Session IDs should be generated using a cryptographically secure random number generator, and should be sufficiently long to prevent brute-force guessing attacks.

  4. Use HTTPS: All communications between the user’s browser and the server should be encrypted using HTTPS to prevent eavesdropping and tampering with session cookies.

  5. Store sensitive data server-side: Sensitive data, such as authentication tokens or session IDs, should be stored server-side and not in the user’s browser to reduce the risk of theft or tampering.

  6. Implement multi-factor authentication: Multi-factor authentication, such as using a combination of a password and a one-time code sent to the user’s mobile phone, can reduce the risk of session hijacking or fixation.

  7. Regularly review and update session management policies: Session management policies should be regularly reviewed and updated to ensure that they are aligned with current best practices and regulatory requirements.

  8. Conduct regular vulnerability assessments and penetration testing: Regular vulnerability assessments and penetration testing can help identify Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities and other security weaknesses in the application.

  9. Educate users about session security: Users should be educated about session security best practices, such as logging out when they are finished using the application and avoiding using public computers or unsecured networks to access sensitive information.

  10. Use security frameworks and guidelines: Security frameworks like OWASP Top Ten and guidelines like NIST SP 800-53 can provide guidance and best practices for implementing secure session management in web applications.

Mitigations for Insufficient Session Timeout

  1. Implement appropriate session timeout periods: Session timeout periods should be set appropriately based on the application’s security requirements and the sensitivity of the data being accessed.

  2. Implement session termination: Sessions should be terminated when the user logs out or after a period of inactivity. This helps ensure that session state is cleared and cannot be reused by an attacker.

  3. Use secure session identifiers: Session identifiers should be long, random, and unique to prevent attackers from guessing or predicting them. They should also be regenerated after each login or session change to reduce the risk of session fixation attacks.

  4. Implement HTTPS: HTTPS should be used for all communications between the user’s browser and the server to prevent eavesdropping and tampering with session cookies.

  5. Store sensitive data server-side: Sensitive data, such as authentication tokens or session identifiers, should be stored server-side and not in the user’s browser to reduce the risk of theft or tampering.

  6. Implement multi-factor authentication: Multi-factor authentication can help prevent session hijacking and fixation by requiring additional factors, such as a one-time code sent to the user’s mobile phone, in addition to a password.

  7. Monitor session activity: Session activity should be monitored to detect unusual behavior, such as multiple logins from different IP addresses, that may indicate an active attack.

  8. Conduct regular vulnerability assessments and penetration testing: Regular assessments and testing can help identify Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities and other security weaknesses in the application.

  9. Educate users: Users should be educated about session security best practices, such as logging out when they are finished using the application and avoiding using public computers or unsecured networks to access sensitive information.

  10. Follow security frameworks and guidelines: Security frameworks like OWASP Top Ten and guidelines like NIST SP 800-53 can provide guidance and best practices for implementing secure session management in web applications.

Conclusion

Insufficient Session Timeout is a serious vulnerability that can allow attackers to hijack user sessions and gain unauthorized access to sensitive data or functionality in web applications. It occurs when session timeouts are set too long or not enforced properly, leaving user sessions open for an extended period of time.

To prevent Insufficient Session Timeout vulnerabilities, it is important to implement appropriate session timeout periods, use secure session identifiers, store sensitive data server-side, and implement HTTPS. Other mitigations such as multi-factor authentication, monitoring session activity, regular vulnerability assessments, and user education can also help improve the security of web applications.

It is important for organizations and developers to stay informed about the latest security threats and vulnerabilities and to follow best practices and security frameworks to prevent and mitigate security risks.

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